Thursday, September 20, 2018

Taste & Sounds on South Lake Avenue Returns to Pasadena, CA on Sept. 29


Fro-yo girl here. San Gabriel Valley’s largest culinary community event, Taste of South Lake, celebrates its 10-year anniversary. This year’s event is called Taste & Sounds on South Lake and will take place on Saturday, September 29, from noon – 5 PM.

This free event includes live music, cooking demos from celebrity chefs, family friendly activities, and the chance to taste the offerings of over 20 South Lake Avenue restaurants, including Yogurtland, Mercado, Nektar, SunLife Organics, SanSai, Urbane CafĂ©, The Counter, Du-Par’s, and Mendocino Farms. Mendocino Farms hasn’t opened its Lake Ave. location yet.

Free admission and free parking.

For a list of participating businesses, musical acts, and cooking demos, view the event flyer: http://www.southlakeavenue.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/tastes-sounds_flyer-web.pdf

I can’t wait to see what Yogurtland (Lake) brings (pumpkie pie froyo?).

You know you love me. X0 X0, fro-yo girl.

Looking for more frozen yogurt news, discussion boards, and resources? Check out the International Frozen Yogurt Association website at http://internationalfrozenyogurt.com/. The IFYA is the independent voice of the frozen yogurt industry.

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Samlip Mamade Blueberry Yogurt Big Chou Review




Fro-yo girl here. I remember when Beard Papa first opened in San Francisco. Many people were excited to try fresh cream puffs. After eating a few cream puffs, I lost interest. But then I spotted Samlip Blueberry Yogurt flavored cream puffs at Hmart in Arcadia, CA and I was intrigued.

One bag comes with four cream puffs. The puffs are imported from Korea. Hmart was selling one bag of puffs for $2.99. They had some other puff flavors too, but only one yogurt flavored kind.

The puffs can be eaten frozen, at room temperature or even baked in the oven. I had to try it frozen because then the filling can be considered as frozen yogurt (but with no yogurt cultures).

Frozen chou: I was impressed by the ample amount of filling. The chou shell was light and dry/chewy. The blueberry frozen yogurt filling was creamy, dense, heavy, and smooth. It tasted like blueberry ice cream w/ a hint of yogurt from the addition of yogurt powder. The filling was sweet without any tang. I could taste the blueberry though the flavor was not intense. The filling and the chou were not too sweet.

Room temperature chou: The filling softened but stayed dense, thick, and creamy.

The list of ingredients is crazy long. Two puffs are 200 calories, 15g total fat, 14g total carbs, and 2g sugars. One puff is round and 2 inches in diameter.

4 out of 5 stars.

* HMART: 1101 W Huntington Dr., Arcadia, CA 91007

You know you love me. X0 X0, fro-yo girl.

Looking for more frozen yogurt news, discussion boards, and resources? Check out the International Frozen Yogurt Association website at http://internationalfrozenyogurt.com/. The IFYA is the independent voice of the frozen yogurt industry.

Monday, September 17, 2018

Complete Short Frozen Yogurt Survey for a Chance to Win Froyo Gift Cards



Fro-yo girl here. There's still time to be part of the Second Annual National (US) Frozen Yogurt Consumer Survey before time runs out. The survey closes at midnight on Wednesday, September 19, 2018.

For a chance to win froyo gift cards, just complete the short 5 minute survey:
http://tinyurl.com/2ndfroyoconsumersurvey

The survey is open to anyone over 13 who lives in the US. Responses will remain anonymous. One response per person please.

Five winners will be selected. Each winner will receive a $30 froyo gift card to a froyo shop of her choosing. The shop must sell online gift cards.


Be sure to tell your friends and loved ones to take the National Frozen Yogurt Survey too! 

The International Frozen Yogurt Association would like to hear from frozen yogurt consumers across the country about their frozen yogurt consumption, attitudes, and preferences. The results of the survey will be shared with frozen yogurt stores and others in the frozen yogurt industry.

Share the Survey URL to Gain Access to the Survey Results


Anyone who is interested in the survey results simply needs to share IFYA’s pinned Facebook post (https://www.facebook.com/froyoassociation/) by midnight PST on September 19, 2018, and then send a private message with an email address after sharing.
* NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Void where prohibited by law. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received. For complete rules, see: http://internationalfrozenyogurt.com/second-annual-national-frozen-yogurt-consumer-survey-official-rules/

You know you love me. X0 X0, fro-yo girl.

Looking for more frozen yogurt news, discussion boards, and resources? Check out the International Frozen Yogurt Association website at http://internationalfrozenyogurt.com/. The IFYA is the independent voice of the frozen yogurt industry.

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Remembering Yeti Yogurt, the Pacific Northwest Froyo Chain


Fro-yo girl here. Back in April 2013, five years ago, I shared some pictures of the newly opened Yeti Yogurt in the Queen Anne neighborhood of Seattle, WA. The location in the University District of Seattle seems to have opened around the same time.

This was the beginning of Yeti Yogurt’s expansion as they sought to dominate froyo in the Pacific Northwest. Yeti Yogurt exploded onto the scene in 2013 in a way that I hadn’t seen before. They opened most of their locations in 2013. Suddenly, Yeti Yogurt had two locations in Tacoma, both opened in 2013, and locations in Sumner, Puyallup, Maple Valley, Tukwila and two in Canada, in North Vancouver and Burnaby. 


The Canadian locations were sold to Qoola. The other locations started to close. It looks like only one location remains, in Sumner, WA, with reduced hours (2 PM - 9 PM on weekdays, 11 AM - 10 PM on weekends). Their website domain, is available from GoDaddy. The last @yetiyogurt Instagram post was on June 7, 2016.

Yeti Yogurt stores featured a minimum of 16 flavors every day and over 60 toppings. The design was bright and colorful. The Yeti mascot likely appealed to kids. The Yeti bigfoot spoons appealed to people like me, the yogurt spoon collectors. They had proprietary flavors and more toppings and yogurt flavors than the competition.

How did Yeti Yogurt grow so quickly? The explanation seems to rest in the fact that it was started by BigFoot Investments, which also founded the BigFoot Java specialty coffee chain in the Pacific Northwest. Yeti Yogurt even offered some BigFoot Java branded flavors, such as Mythical Mocha®, Strawberry Sasquatch® or Nutty Yeti®.

What happened to Yeti Yogurt? Reading through the old employee and customer reviews, people cited lack of management and poor training. The stores started strong but later, towards the end, the yogurt was runny, the shop was dirty, and the price was very high. Another factor is probably location. People don’t eat as much froyo in the Pacific Northwest compared to California.

Sadly, I never tried Yeti Yogurt, but on the bright side, I do have their yogurt spoons.

You know you love me. X0 X0, fro-yo girl.

Looking for more frozen yogurt news, discussion boards, and resources? Check out the International Frozen Yogurt Association website at http://internationalfrozenyogurt.com/. The IFYA is the independent voice of the frozen yogurt industry.

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Homemade Kombucha Kefir/Yogurt Experiments




Fro-yo girl here. Kefir is typically made with kefir cultures but it is possible to make something like kefir with kombucha SCOBY. I’ve read that kombucha kefir can be made with any type of milk, dairy or non-dairy. Since I love yogurt and kefir, I was very excited to make my own kefir kombucha or yogurt kombucha.

I tried making kefir kombucha using three different methods.

Method 1: 
Add SCOBY to milk 

I started with Whole Foods brand 2% milk. After preparing the kombucha yogurt by adding a SCOBY directly to the milk, I checked on it every day. It never smelled pleasant and the SCOBY curled up and looked like it had died. After three days at room temperature, the mixture separated and remained in liquid form. The bottom half of it was whey. It smelled and looked awful, so I threw it away without trying it. 

In retrospect, it seems odd to put a SCOBY in refrigerated millk, since the SCOBY prefers a warm environment. It seemed like a good idea to try Method 2, scald the milk first and incubating in a warm place. 


This time I used 2% milk from Aldi (Friendly Farms brand). I scalded half a gallon of milk, and let it cool to a warm bath temperature. I added a SCOBY around 9 PM. The next day I warmed the oven three times (at the lowest temperature setting) and put the jar of milk w/ the SCOBY in the oven. About 24 hours later, the mixture separated. It was still liquid but there was whey on top. It didn’t smell as bad as what I created w/ Method 1, so I gave it a try. It tasted okay but didn’t have much flavor or tang. Since it didn’t get thicker, I don’t think this method worked for me. But small curds had formed and they tasted okay. I didn’t like the texture. 


Method 3: Incubate your SCOBY first using kefir, then add milk 

This method involves creating a hybrid kefir/kombucha mother first. Since it involves buying commercial kefir first, I tried this method last.

Basically, you put your SCOBY in a jar and pour a layer of kefir on top, swirl it and leave it for a few days. Repeat the process until you’ve used up the bottle of kefir. This creates a hybrid kefir/kombucha mother.

I used a quart of unsweetened, original Lifeway Kefir made with whole milk. I poured some in for five days straight, swirled it around, and on the fifth day, added a quart of 2% milk from Aldi. I waited two more days before pulling the SCOBY out.

The SCOBY was definitely doing something to the kefir. The kefir smelled warm and yeasty and it looked bubbly. When I tasted it, it was very sour. It was a bit thicker than milk and it had curds, but the whey hadn’t separated out. It smelled similar to my batches using Methods 1 and 2 but it looked better since the whey hadn’t separated out.

I made this kefir during the summer, when the temperatures were in the high 90’s during the day and the 70’s at night.

It tasted okay – it was too sour even for me. When I sweetened it, it tasted better but it still didn’t seem worth the effort because I like commercial kefir better. I could have strained it to thicken it up, but it didn't seem worth the hassle.


Method 3 was the only method that worked for me.



You know you love me. X0 X0, fro-yo girl.

Looking for more frozen yogurt news, discussion boards, and resources? Check out the International Frozen Yogurt Association website at http://internationalfrozenyogurt.com/. The IFYA is the independent voice of the frozen yogurt industry.

Saturday, September 8, 2018

Pressed Juicery Testing New Products, Overnight Oats and Chia Pudding



Fro-yo girl here. During my recent visit to the Pressed Juicery in Hollywood to get my Pressed Freeze, I spotted a sign for overnight oats and chia pudding. I haven’t seen that sign at the other Pressed Juicery locations that I’ve been to. They had four varieties for $5 each:

  • Almond Vanilla Chia Pudding with Berries 
  • Lemon & Blueberry Overnight Oats 
  • Coconut Chia Pudding with Blueberries 
  • Peanut Butter & Banana Overnight Oats 

The price seems very reasonable. I didn’t try it but I should have bought one for later. I made overnight oats once, but I didn’t like the mushy texture at all. Chia pudding has some texture that overnight oats lack.

You know you love me. X0 X0, fro-yo girl.

* PRESSED JUICERY: Pressed Juicery, 6201 Hollywood Blvd., Ste 128, Los Angeles (Hollywood), CA 90028

Looking for more frozen yogurt news, discussion boards, and resources? Check out the International Frozen Yogurt Association website at http://internationalfrozenyogurt.com/. The IFYA is the independent voice of the frozen yogurt industry.

Friday, September 7, 2018

Pumpkin Pie Froyo Returns to Yogurtland, Early!



Fro-yo girl here. It doesn’t feel like fall until I’ve had my cup of pumpkin pie (or pumpkin) frozen yogurt. Yogurtland brought back Pumpkin Pie froyo late last year. Fortunately, it’s back early this year, at certain locations. Check the Flavor Finder feature on the Yogurtland website or Real Rewards app. I wasn’t sure if they’d bring back Pumpkin Pie or Pumpkin Whip, or offer a different pumpkin flavor altogether.

This year it’s Pumpkin Pie froyo’s turn and I’m happy with that. It’s their classic pumpkin flavor. Pumpkin Pie froyo is made with real pumpkin and real pumpkin pie spices. I love the warm notes of cinnamon and nutmeg in the yogurt. My favorite Pumpkin Pie froyo toppings are whipped cream, almonds, graham cracker crumbs, Nilla Wafers, and occasionally crushed Butterfingers.

You know you love me. X0 X0, fro-yo girl.

Looking for more frozen yogurt news, discussion boards, and resources? Check out the International Frozen Yogurt Association website at http://internationalfrozenyogurt.com/. The IFYA is the independent voice of the frozen yogurt industry.